Digital Archive – Featured Item

Waiuku museum has selected items from the collection and archive available online at https://archive.org/details/waiuku-museum

Today’s featured item from this digital archive is a cook book.  It is Tamakae Reserve Information, a leaflet made by the Waiuku Museum Society to give information about the reserve and the buildings owned by the museum on it.  It can be found at the link below:

https://archive.org/details/tamakaereserveinformation_201911

Take a look at the other items that are also available.

Waiuku in the News – Butter Factory

The National Dairy Association’s butter factory on the outskirts of Waiuku. The photograph was probably taken not long after the factory was opened on 22 September 1915.
https://kura.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz/digital/collection/photos/id/37965/rec/1
 

WAIUKU BUTTER FACTORY

Satisfactory Progress.

Notwithstanding the continuous spell of bad weather experienced lately, good progress is being made with the erection of the New Zealand Dairy Association’s new butter factory at Waiuku. On Wednesday last the manager, Mr A. Stevenson-, who is at present acting in the capacity of clerk-of-works, kindly explained the latest phases of the development of the work to a representative of the “Times.” ‘ The power block of buildings are now practically completed, and the Association’s engineers are installing a part of the machinery, including an engine and Linde freezer. The boilers are expected to arrive it any time. The main concrete work of the building is almost completed structurally, one wall being finished and the ethers nearly to. The huge beams to support the roofing are already fitted, and have the bolt holes and mortises made in them, ready to fasten .together as soon as they are hoisted into position, and all the timber is at hand, cut into lengths, ready to nail up. The main beam, it may be mentioned, is a huge “stick,” a the tradesmen humorously allude to it, of sixty feet in length. The contract for the manager’s house has been secured by a local builder, Mr J. P. Drumgool, and for the single men’s quarters by a Hamilton firm. Already the building is, in a double sense, a “concrete” proof of the great progress made by the Association.

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/PWT19150702.2.2.3

Pukekohe & Waiuku Times, Volume 4, Issue 51, 2 July 1915, Page 1

If you would like this with other newspaper articles in a PDF format just e-mail us at waiukumuseum@gmail.com

Digital Archive – Feature Item

Waiuku museum has selected items from the collection and archive available online at https://archive.org/details/waiuku-museum

Today’s featured item from this digital archive is an advertisement.  It is an advertisement for Glaxo.  It can be found at the link below:

https://archive.org/details/glaxoadvertisment_201911

Take a look at the other items that are also available.

Waiuku in the News – Poet’s Corner

On 13 July 1889 a poem was published in the Observer titled Where is Waiuku? or, The Lamentable History of the Discovery of Waiuku by the Noble Knight, Sir Tramp.

Below is the poem for your enjoyment.

Observer, Volume 9, Issue 550, 13 July 1889, Page 14

Digital Archive – Featured Item

Waiuku museum has selected items from the collection and archive available online at https://archive.org/details/waiuku-museum

Today’s featured item from this digital archive is a cook book.  It is the Enquire Within booklet, the main purpose of the publication is advertising, but there are useful hints etc. to be found in it.  It can be found at the link below:

https://archive.org/details/forwhatyouwanttoknowenquirewithin-4theditionofthiswonderfulbooklet/mode/2up

Take a look at the other items that are also available.

Waiuku in the News – Gum Digging

Deep Digging for Gum on Mr. Potter’s Farm, Waiuku
(Auckland Libraries Heritage Collections AWNS-19000831-7-3)
 

Kauri Gum at Waiuku

Interesting Developments

Deposits Found at Depth

[By Our Special Reporter.]

The presence of kauri gum in certain lands in and about Waiuku has been known for some considerable time. On the clay lands on the Manukau slope of Waipipi ans Awitu very considerable quantities have been dug in past years, and at present say there is still quite a number of diggers scattered over the fern hills. These lands, like the majority of gumfields, where the gum is near the surface, are of poor quality, unfenced, and from an agricultural point of view neglected. It is, therefore, little wonder that a farmer in a rich pastoral district like Waiuku, if he happened to strike sundry pieces of “black Jack” while draining swampy portions of his land, should hurriedly bury the telltale find lest the damning appellage of “kauri gum land” attach to his property. But times and manner change. Only last week a arm in the centre of the Waiuku district was advertised for sale, the chief advantage relied on being that is was “kauri gum land.”

But why the change? A visit to the district soon enlightens one. It was discovered recently that the gum deposits in some of the swamps reclaimed years ago, and which have since become grass grown paddocks of much fertility, were considerable, and further investigation showed that the product could be won at at very respectable profit. There was, centuries since, a large kauri forest growing between Manukau and the Waikato River. In course of time destruction came, the land sank, or changes in the water shed, possibly even a change id course in the Waikato River itself had partly submerged the timber. Then gradually as the years went by the alluvial washings cam down from the hills and covered the buried vegetable matter to a considerable depth, effectually protecting the igneous deposit from destruction by fire. Years afterwards man came on the scene, and digging drains and sowed grass, and by degrees, as the water was carried away, and the surface trodden by cattle, the soft alluvial deposit settle down into the hard ground. So while gumfields in the North were searched and researched for gum, here, hidden snug away in a remote corner, were a few deposits untouched by the hand of man,

Within the past year, however, it was found that this gum could be worked profitably, and now every piece of swamp in the district has been searched and speared for the once despised resin. Already gum to the value of several thousand pounds has been removed, and there is much more to follow. The pioneer of the new discoveries, and the one most largely interested in the different swamps, is Mr. George Potter, of Waiuku. He had lately completed the digging of ten acres of land right in the township, and has removed almost ₤800 worth of gum as a result of operations. He has, in addition, a freehold property containing over 50 acres of gum-bearing land, very rich in the deposit, and has leased gum rights in several other fields. Messrs. Flavel have also several properties which they are working, and Mr. R Henry and Mr. John Moore, of Mauku, have both leased gum rights in different farms. In addition, the properties of Captain McGill, and Messers. Barriball, Waterman, McGowan, and others contain some rich swamps, most of which are now being worked either by the owners themselves, by day labour, or on royalty. The ordinary digger will have some idea of the richness of the deposits when it is stated that 25 per cent. royalty is the common tribute charged. It is no uncommon thing to take upwards of ₤100 worth of gum to the acre from the richer swamps at a cost by day labour of between ₤30 or ₤40, according to depth.

The method of digging is unique. Instead of the indiscriminate digging on a “surface” field, or the “pot holing” of the northern swamps, here every inch of the ground is dug over. At a depth of between three and four feet, where the ground is well set, the deposit is found in a comparatively even layer, and I have heard it likened to a crop of potatoes planted deep. The soil is trenched to the depth of the layer and taken down in “falls,” some of which are over 20ft in length, and the gum extracted for the bottom before the next “fall” is made. The method in which these “falls” are worked is shown in the accompanying photographs, which show Mr. Potter’s men at work, trenching and falling, and Mr. Potter himself supervising. It is something of a novelty also to find the work done by wages men. In the average field this would be an impossibility, but there the deposit is so uniform and certain that the owner of the field can work the gum “mining” (to use a suggestive term) as a business, and considerably to his advantage.

In another picture is exhibited the method of washing the gum. On the left is a large specimen of gum, and a “paddock” of smaller pieces, which will give the reader some idea of how the product is raised. The quality is not of the best, being brown gum, and mainly of the lower grades, but was is lacked in respect is amply made up in quantity. Another photograph exhibits the interior of the gumshed at Mr. Potter’s property, with scrapping in full operation, while the representing camp of the diggers is difficult to distinguish from a mining camp in the goldfields.

In concluding this short notice of an interesting subject, I may say that the opening of the rich deposit has attracted many diggers and other to place, and, together with the great success of the rich pastoral swamps of Akeake, Awaroa, and Maioro streams, of which more anon, has brought Waiuku to the forefront of country districts of the province.

With its present prospects Waiuku bids fair to increase rapidly in importance, and bold indeed would be the man to ask now in language that was used in days gone by, “Where is Waiuku?”

Auckland Weekly News 30 December 1898

Another View of Deep Digging for Gum, Waiuku
(Auckland Libraries Heritage Collections AWNS-18981230-2-1)
 
Camp of Gumdigger at Mr. Potter’s Farm, Waiuku.
(Auckland Libraries Heritage Collections AWNS-18981230-1-2)
 
Washing Gum at Waiuku
(Auckland Libraries Heritage Collections AWNS-18981230-2-3)
 
Scraping Gum at Waiuku
(Auckland Libraries Heritage Collections AWNS-18981230-3-1)
 

If you would like this with other newspaper articles in a PDF format just e-mail us at waiukumuseum@gmail.com

Digital Archive – Feature Item

Waiuku museum has selected items from the collection and archive available online at https://archive.org/details/waiuku-museum

Today’s featured item from this digital archive is an advertisement.  It is the Eno advertisement.  It can be found at the link below:

https://archive.org/details/enoadvertisment_201911

Take a look at the other items that are also available.

Waiuku in the News – Water Supply

The Waiuku reservoir, ca 1935. Waiuku’s reticulated water supply was first turned on on 22 May 1930. The water was piped from this concrete reservoir on Barnaby’s Hill, high on the ridge above Victoria Avenue. The reservoir was demolished in 2002.
https://kura.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz/digital/collection/photos/id/39732/rec/1

WAIUKU WATER SUPPLY.

SEVERAL UNUSUAL FEATURES

WELLS SUNK AT HIGH LEVEL.

The new water supply system for the town of Waiuku, which has just been completed, presents a number of interesting features, one of the most unusual being that the wells from which the supply is drawn are at the highest point in the town, about 150 ft. above sea level, alongside the storage reservoir. There is therefore no need to raise the water from the bores through long pipe lines to the reservoir, which is high enough to give a satisfactory pressure.

The site was first tested with a small pioneer bore, which gave a sufficient supply to warrant proceeding with the scheme. The test bore was driven to a total depth of 240 ft., or 90ft. below sea level, but very little water was found below the 160 ft. level. The country passed through comprised clay, hard basalt and pumice, with sands of various textures. So hard was the basaltic rock that occasionally the permanent bores could be sunk only 1 in. a day with a very heavy set of tools.

There are two permanent bores, one sunk to a depth of 162 ft. and the other to 192 ft., the casings being in diameter. Precautions have been taken to exclude sand, and this has been achieved, the report of the Health Department showing that the water is one of the purest in the province.

The total field drawn on by the wells is not known, as the pumps working at their maximum capacity have little influence on the level of the supply. It is necessary to pump into the 100,000-gallon reservoir only every three days to cope with the present demand, while there is a wide margin for contingencies. Nearly the whole of the work, except the installation of the pumps, was carried out by residents of the district holding subcontracts, while the remainder was done by the Town Board’s staff.

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19300830.2.119

New Zealand Herald, Volume LXVII, Issue 20656, 30 August 1930, Page 13

If you would like this with other newspaper articles in a PDF format just e-mail us at waiukumuseum@gmail.com

Digital Archive – Featured Item

Waiuku museum has selected items from the collection and archive available online at https://archive.org/details/waiuku-museum

Today’s featured item from this digital archive is a map.  It is the Camps Occupied By US Troops and has information on where there were camps of US tropps during WWII in Auckland.  It can be found at the link below:

https://archive.org/details/campsoccupiedbyustroops_201911

Take a look at the other items that are also available.

Waiuku in the News – Whirlwind at Waiuku

WHIRLWIND AT WAIUKU.

On Thursday evening last a terrific whirlwind or tornado, or something similar, passed over Waiuku East. It was seen first near the village, and seemed to travel in the direction west to east . It passed over the properties of Messrs. Walters, Barriball, Hodge, Hull, &c., tearing up a number of large puriri and other trees, and destroying several chains of post-and-rail fencing. Such a thing, has not been witnessed in this district previously. Fortunately no houses happened to be in its course, or else they would have been destroyed with its mighty force. — [Own Correspondent, June 25.]

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH18810629.2.32

New Zealand Herald, Volume XVIII, Issue 6120, 29 June 1881, Page 5

The following short excerpt was published in the papers listed below on 30th June 1881.

“A whirlwind passed over Waiuku, rooting up trees and destroying fencing.”

  • Oamaru Mail
  • Ashburton Guardian
  • Grey River Argus
  • Wanganui Chronicle
  • West Coast Times
  • Globe
  • Southland Times
  • Evening Post
  • Otago Daily Times
  • Star
  • Hawke’s Bay Herald
  • New Zealand Times
  • Press
  • Thames Advertiser
  • Timaru Herald

If you would like this with other newspaper articles in a PDF format just e-mail us at waiukumuseum@gmail.com