Photo Essay – Building the Steel Mill – Part 2

Photographer: M Buttimore.
Waiuku Museum Society Collection
Photographer: M Buttimore.
Waiuku Museum Society Collection
Photographer: M Buttimore.
Waiuku Museum Society Collection
Photographer: M Buttimore.
Waiuku Museum Society Collection
Photographer: M Buttimore.
Waiuku Museum Society Collection
Photographer: M Buttimore.
Waiuku Museum Society Collection

Photo Essay – Building the Steel Mill – Part 1

Steel Mill Site
Photographer: M Buttimore.
Waiuku Museum Society Collection
A pile driver in action on the site of the Glenbrook steel mill, 1966.
https://kura.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz/digital/collection/photos/id/39641
Photographer: M Buttimore.
Waiuku Museum Society Collection
Photographer: M Buttimore.
Waiuku Museum Society Collection
Photographer: M Buttimore.
Waiuku Museum Society Collection

Waiuku in the News – Heavy Rains

HEAVY FLOODS.
[By TELEGRAPH. —OWN CORRESPONDENTS.]
WAIUKU.
Waiuku, Monday.
On Friday it commenced raining, and on Saturday it came down in torrents, and continued unabated until midday on Sunday, when the level part of the country was completely flooded. A great amount of was done. Several bridges have been swept away, namely — Newdick’s, Brown’s creeks, and others — stopping all traffic between Mauku and Pukekohe. The mailman started this morning with the mails, but had to return. The mail will have to go by the steamer. The Waitangi mill has guttered severely. The water-wheel, twenty feet in diameter, has been carried away, as well as the dam. Every precaution wan taken for: its safety, and at five a.m. on Sunday all was safe, but so rapidly did the water rise that by eight o’clock everything was gone save the mill-house. The water reached a greater height than is known by the oldest settler. It was several feet over the Waitangi Bridge, which fortunately has stood the, the heaviest of floods. No word has reached here from the south and north-west of the district, where it is possible damage may also have occurred.
MAUKU.

After the long drought the rain has been falling for twenty-four hours, and the Mauku river has risen to a height not known for over 20 years, and I regret to say it has been the means of doing a good deal of destruction. The bridge on the road from Pukekohe to Waiuku over the Mauku is swept away entirely, as also another one on the road from the church to Lower Mauku. The water rose fully 10 feet over them, which of course was more than they could stand. Fortunately for the District Board the Government had called for tenders for a new bridge on the Waiuku road. All the flat land near the river was flooded for acres, and it looked more like the Waikato than the Mauku. The fails were a grand sight — in fact a miniature Niagara. I am sorry tosay Mr. G. Johnson is at a great loss by the fresh, his mill dam being carried away, not a vestige being left; then the bridge over the river between his house and flax-mill went after the other two, and his loss must be over £100. He had also the store-room full of dried flax, and the water was nearly up to the wall plates. Potato crops must suffer by the quantity of water about, and from being for want of rain. I fear they will now be made lighter from having too much. Those are lucky who had them up before the rain came on. — [Own Correspondent.]

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH18830227.2.24

New Zealand Herald, Volume XX, Issue 6639, 27 February 1883, Page 5

If you would like this with other newspaper articles in a PDF format just e-mail us at waiukumuseum@gmail.com

Waiuku in the News – Battle of Titi Hill

On 23 October 1965 a concrete memorial cairn commemorating the battle of Tītī Hill was unveiled alongside the Waiuku to Pukekohe road, near Mauku. The event was organised by members of the Franklin Historical Society.
Photographer: Douglas Allan Oldfield Part of the Waiuku Museum collection.

NATIVE ACCOUNT OF THE MAUKU ENGAGEMENT.
We learn, on perfectly reliable authority, that the following is the Native account of this affair: — They state that the natives were present to the number of 400 men from the Ngatimaniapoto and two other tribes, who had come over with the intention of making a grand attack upon Mauku, which place seems to have gained an honorable notoriety amongst them. When they found themselves opposed to but 60 men in the field, they made sure of killing all, and must have been grievously disappointed at the result. They say they killed 14 of our men, besides wounding vast numbers, while they acknowledge to having themselves lost about 12 men and one important chief killed in the action, while many more were wounded. The loss was felt to be very severe, as is evident from the fact that they did not delay longer than was requisite to gather up their killed and wounded, before making again for the river, which they crossed the same night, at eleven o’clock. The party which was observed next day by our men on the field of battle, did not belong to the party who fought at all, but were a small body of thirteen men who met the others as they were re-crossiug the Waikato, and hearing of the battle anxiously inquired whether the volleys had been fired over the field, as ought to be done, in claiming a victory. The answer was that this had not been done; upon which the new comers kindly offered to go and supply the deficiency. They reached the ground about daybreak, and fired the salutes heard by our men. Seeing, however, our Defence Force men coming up the valley on horseback, they fled precipitately to the Waikato, and were in the act of crossing when fired on by the flying column. The natives are firmly persuaded that they were pursued and finally tired upon by the horsemen from whom they originally fled. They say that no one was killed by the fire, but one man was wounded in the neck who fell overboard in his fright. The account is chiefly interesting as showing how much they must have suffered. To account for their own losses they state that they engaged 500 pakehas. As they thought fit to double our loss, it is not improbable they may have proportionately diminished their own. This account is entirely from native sources, and may be relied on as being at all events one version of those published by authority of the native military magnates.

We have the following intelligence also, through a Maori channel: — “At the Mauku fight of last week, the Maoris lost 8 killed, and have taken 40 wounded (of course several so as to be hors de combat) up the Waipa. Tikaokao’s son and nephew are both killed. The tribes engaged were: — Ngatimaniapoto, 150; Urewera, 100 ; Ngatiporou, 50. This fight was these first work in which the Urewera and Ngatiporou were engaged. They had just arrived at the scene of operations, bringing each man a back load of powder from the East Cape. Tikoukou is of Mokau (Ngatimaniapoto county), and was lately appointed generalissimo of the native army. He was not present himself. They took up the river no end of boxes, &c., which they carried overland from Howick, via Mauku

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/DSC18631106.2.13

Daily Southern Cross, Volume XIX, Issue 1968, 6 November 1863, Page 2

If you would like this with other newspaper articles in a PDF format just e-mail us at waiukumuseum@gmail.com

Photo Essay – Waiuku Post Office – Part 2

Photographer: Douglas Allan Oldfield
Waiuku Museum Society Collection

The Waiuku Post Office, Queen Street, Waiuku, May 1970. This was Waiuku’s second post office building, erected in 1914 and replaced in 1977. The Post Office Savings Bank building can be seen next door.
https://kura.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz/digital/collection/photos/id/38762
Scene during the opening ceremony for the new Waiuku Post Office, Queen Street, Waiuku, 14 November 1977. Waiuku mayor Kevan Lawrence addresses the crowd with Franklin MP the Hon. W.F. (Bill) Birch to his right.
https://kura.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz/digital/collection/photos/id/36894
Photographer: Douglas Allan Oldfield
Waiuku Museum Society Collection
Photographer: Douglas Allan Oldfield
Waiuku Museum Society Collection
Photographer: Douglas Allan Oldfield
Waiuku Museum Society Collection

Photo Essay – Waiuku Post Office – Part 1

View of the first Waiuku Post Office building viewed across the bridge at the northern end of Queen Street, ca 1910. This post office building was opened in 1877 and replaced by a new building at the opposite end of the town in 1914. The old wooden bridge in the foreground was replaced by a ferro-concrete structure in or around October 1913.
https://kura.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz/digital/collection/photos/id/41884

Group portrait of Waiuku Post office staff, ca 1937. Left to right: Mr McKenzie (supervisor), Archie Canham (mailman), Jack Johnston (telephone exchange), Cyril Comer (teller), Mr Eastick (Postmaster), V.J. (‘Taff’) Zinzan (mail carrier to the Manukau Heads), Hilton Parmenter (postman), Harry Fuller (clerk).
https://kura.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz/digital/collection/photos/id/43127
Post Office building, Queen Street, Waiuku, ca 1955. The Post Office Savings Bank building is next door.
https://kura.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz/digital/collection/photos/id/42596
Photographer: Douglas Allan Oldfield
Waiuku Museum Society Collection
Photographer: Douglas Allan Oldfield
Waiuku Museum Society Collection

Waiuku in the News – Opening of Karioitahi New School Building

NEW SCHOOL NEAR WAIUKU OFFICIALLY OPENED. Top: The new building of the Kariaotahi school, which was opened by Mr. J. N. Massey, M.P., yesterday. Lower: The chairman of the Education Board, Mr. A. Burns, addressing the gathering. From left—Mr. F. M. Shepherd, headmaster, Mr. H. Knight, chairman of the school committee, Mr. Massey, Mr. Burns and Mr. Patterson.
https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19310926.2.18.5
New Zealand Herald, Volume LXVIII, Issue 20988, 26 September 1931, Page 6

NEW SCHOOL OPENED.
CEREMONY AT KARIAOTAHI.
AN UP-TO-DATE BUILDING
[FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.]
WAIUKU, Friday
Over 200 people were present at the official opening of the new school at Kariaotahi, some three miles from Waiuku, this afternoon. Among those present were many ex-pupils of the school, some of whom were scholars there as far back as 47 years ago. The school was first opened on August 4, 1879, with 20 pupils. To-day there are 52 on the roll. Reference to the early days was made by the head teacher; Mr. F. M. Shepherd. He said the building which served as the first school was the first structure to be erected in sawn timber in the district. It was in reality . a two-roomed house, and was lent by the owner, Mr. George Bennett, to enable a school to be opened. The timber was cut from a large kauri tree that grew on a near by ridge. In 1883, the Wesleyan Chapel at Waiuku was purchased and re-erected at Kariaotahi, as the permanent school building. The contractor for the removal and re-erection of the structure, Mr. A. Hammond, was still living at the age of 93 years, and even as late as yesterday was engaged in such active work as lopping limbs off a pine tree.
Mr. H. Knight, chairman of the school committee,’ who presided, said the residents were gratified to have an up-to-date and safe school building. Reference was made by Mr. A. Burns, chairman of the Education Board.”to the fact that the new building, with two large classrooms and long entrance corridor, was on the latest lines approved by the board for country schools. The ample window space gave excellent lighting, and the windows were so arranged that splendid ventilation was available in any weather.
Mr. J. Patterson, the district member of the board, said, as the school had to serve also as the social centre of the district, the board had folding doors provided so that the two rooms could be thrown into one when desired. The official opening ceremony was performed by Mr. J. N. Massey, M.P. for Franklin.

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19310926.2.107
New Zealand Herald, Volume LXVIII, Issue 20988, 26 September 1931, Page 10

If you would like this with other newspaper articles in a PDF format just e-mail us at waiukumuseum@gmail.com

Waiuku in the News – Flooding in Waiuku

WAIUKU.
[BY TELEGRAPH—OWN CORRESPONDENT.]
WAIUKU. Tuesday.
The heaviest of the flood was experienced here this morning. Settlers have been engaged all day removing stock, three small boats having been taken from the Waiuku Wharf to assist in the work of rescue. Two narrow escapes from drowning are reported. A son of Mr. Henry Smith was returning from the creamery, and found that the water had risen so high over the bridge that the horse refused to cross. Smith, in attempting to lead the horse across, was swept off his legs, and was carried away with the current. Fortunately, an older brother was near at the time, and rescued him. Mr. Kerebs, who was also returning from the creamery, found the bridge gone. He left his horse and cart, and attempted to cross. He was carried down the creek, but got caught in some branches, and was rescued by a friend. Numerous bridges have been carried away, no less than 10 going in the Waipipi road district alone. At the post office end, the Waiuku South bridge was greatly damaged. A large area of land is under water, and oats and potato crops have been ruined. The rain has now stopped. https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19070116.2.80
New Zealand Herald, Volume XLIV, Issue 13387, 16 January 1907, Page 8

If you would like this with other newspaper articles in a PDF format just e-mail us at waiukumuseum@gmail.com

Photo Essay – Historic Cairns – Part 5

Scene at the unveiling of a memorial commemorating the 19th-century mission stations at Orua Bay. On 23 January 1836 Methodist missionary the Reverend William Woon had arrived at Orua Bay to set up a mission station. However, this lasted only six weeks before he was withdrawn from the area, either because of lack of supplies or in honour of an agreement over spheres of influence between the Wesleyans and the Church Missionary Society. In September 1838 Church Missionary Society missionaries Robert Maunsell and James Hamlin bought land at the site for a CMS mission station, and Hamlin himself served there with his family between 1839 and 1844. The memorial was unveiled by the Reverend C.T.J. Luxton on 2 April 1966, with descendants of both the 19th-century Waikato chief Te Wherowhero and James Hamlin present (the latter are seen here).
https://kura.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz/digital/collection/photos/id/38854
Scene at the unveiling of a memorial commemorating the 19th-century mission stations at Orua Bay. On 23 January 1836 Methodist missionary the Reverend William Woon had arrived at Orua Bay to set up a mission station. This lasted only six weeks before he was withdrawn from the area, either because of lack of supplies or in honour of an agreement over spheres of influence between the Wesleyans and the Church Missionary Society. In September 1838 Church Missionary Society missionaries Robert Maunsell and James Hamlin bought land at the site for a CMS mission station, and Hamlin himself served there with his family between 1839 and 1844.
The memorial was unveiled by the Reverend C.T.J. Luxton on 2 April 1966, with descendants of both the 19th-century Waikato chief Te Wherowhero and James Hamlin present.
https://kura.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz/digital/collection/photos/id/38397
Scene at the unveiling of a memorial commemorating the 19th-century mission stations at Orua Bay. On 23 January 1836 Methodist missionary the Reverend William Woon had arrived at Orua Bay to set up a mission station. However, this lasted only six weeks before he was withdrawn from the area, either because of lack of supplies or in honour of an agreement over spheres of influence between the Wesleyans and the Church Missionary Society. In September 1838 Church Missionary Society missionaries Robert Maunsell and James Hamlin bought land at the site for a CMS mission station, and Hamlin himself served there with his family between 1839 and 1844. The memorial was unveiled by the Reverend C.T.J. Luxton on 2 April 1966, with descendants of both the 19th-century Waikato chief Te Wherowhero and James Hamlin present.
https://kura.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz/digital/collection/photos/id/35968
Scene at the unveiling of a memorial commemorating the 19th-century mission stations at Orua Bay. The text of the brass plaque on the concrete memorial cairn, not visible in this photograph, reads: ‘Orua Bay / site of / William Woon’s / Wesleyan mission / 1836 / and the station of / the Church Missionary Society / 1837 – 1844’. On 23 January 1836 Methodist missionary the Reverend William Woon had arrived at Orua Bay to set up a mission station. This lasted only six weeks before he was withdrawn from the area, either because of lack of supplies or in honour of an agreement over spheres of influence between the Wesleyans and the Church Missionary Society. In September 1838 Church Missionary Society missionaries Robert Maunsell and James Hamlin bought land at the site for a CMS mission station, and Hamlin himself served there with his family between 1839 and 1844. The memorial was unveiled by the Reverend C.T.J. Luxton on 2 April 1966, with descendants of both the 19th-century Waikato chief Te Wherowhero and James Hamlin present.
https://kura.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz/digital/collection/photos/id/37465
Ngati Te Ata chief Te Kurirangaunu Sonny Kaihau unveils a monument on the King Street Reserve, Waiuku, 6 November 1971. The concrete cairn beneath the cloak is inset with a plaque that reads: “Tamakae/ A Maori chief/ was washed with/ water (wai)/ & white clay (uku)/ on this spot/ hence the name/ Waiuku”. The King Street Reserve has since been renamed the Tamakae Reserve.
Photographer: Unknown
https://kura.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz/digital/

If you would like all these photos from the photo essay in one PDF document, email us at waiukumuseum@gmail.com

Photo Essay – Historic Cairns – Part 4

Photographer: Douglas Allan Oldfield
Part of the Waiuku Museum collection.
On 23 October 1965 a concrete memorial cairn commemorating the battle of Tītīi Hill was unveiled alongside the Waiuku to Pukekohe road, near Mauku. The event was organised by members of the Franklin Historical Society.
The plaque on the cairn was worded as follows (in capitals): ‘Titi. / Eight Europeans and / an estimated sixteen / Maori warriors / died fighting here / in the Waikato War / 23 October 1863’. Papapokaia Kaihau, representing Tainui, and Margaret Crisp, a descendant of one of the participants in the battle on the Government side, undertook the unveiling.
Sources: ‘Memorial Cairn at Titi: Ceremony on Saturday Recalled Battle in 1863’, Franklin Times, 27/10/1965, p. 1; ‘Laying of Wreath at Titi’ [photograph], Franklin Times, 8/11/1965, p. 1; Nigel Prickett, Landscapes of conflict: a field guide to the New Zealand Wars, Auckland, 2002, pp. xvii, 74.
https://nzhistory.govt.nz/media/photo/t%C4%ABt%C4%AB-hill-nz-wars-memorial
Photographer: Douglas Allan Oldfield
Part of the Waiuku Museum collection.
Photographer: Douglas Allan Oldfield
Part of the Waiuku Museum collection.
Photographer: Douglas Allan Oldfield
Part of the Waiuku Museum collection.